Can Male Dogs Get A UTI?

He’s male but can he get a UTI? ¹

Dogs are susceptible to urinary tract infections (UTIs); if left untreated, the infection can travel up to the kidneys and cause serious health problems. 

UTIs are more common in male dogs than female dogs, and they can be caused by several factors, including bacteria, stones, crystals in the urine, or an enlarged prostate.

If you think your dog may have a UTI, it’s important to take him to the vet for diagnosis and treatment. 

Symptoms of a UTI in dogs include increased frequency of urination, straining to urinate, blood in the urine, and pain or discomfort when urinating. 

If left untreated, a UTI can lead to kidney infection, which can be fatal.

This article will discuss everything you need to know about UTIs in dogs, including the symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment.

What is a UTI?

A UTI is an infection of the urinary system, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. 

The most common type of UTI is a bladder infection, which is also called cystitis. 

The urinary system helps to filter waste and excess water from the blood and produce urine. 

Urine contains waste products that need to be eliminated from the body and excess water and electrolytes.

The urinary system comprises several organs, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. 

The kidneys filter blood and produce urine. The ureters are two tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder. 

The bladder stores urine until it is ready to be eliminated from the body. 

The urethra is a tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body.

What age and sex of dogs are UTIs most common in?

UTIs are more common in male dogs than in female dogs. 

This is because male dogs have a longer urethra, which makes it easier for bacteria to travel up the urethra and into the bladder. 

Male dogs also have a prostate gland, which is located near the opening of the urethra. 

The prostate gland can enlarge with age, which can block the urethra and make it difficult for urine to flow out of the bladder. 

This can lead to an accumulation of bacteria in the bladder, which can cause a UTI.

Age also plays a role in the development of UTIs. 

Dogs of all ages can develop a UTI, but they are more common in senior dogs. 

This is because the kidneys and bladder can become less efficient with age, leading to an accumulation of bacteria in the urinary system. So it is more common in male dogs and senior dogs.

What are the common symptoms of a UTI in a male dog?

If your dog has a UTI, he may show one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Increased frequency of urination
  • Straining to urinate
  • Blood in the urine
  • Pain or discomfort when urinating
  • Urinating small amounts at a time
  • Dribbling urine
  • A strong odor of urine
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite

If your dog is showing any of these symptoms, it’s important to take him to the vet for diagnosis and treatment.

UTIs can cause serious health problems if left untreated, so it’s important to get your dog checked out by a vet as soon as possible. 

And how are the symptoms different for female dogs?

There are some similarities between the symptoms of a UTI in male and female dogs, but there are some key differences. 

For example, female dogs may squat to urinate more frequently than usual, while male dogs may strain to urinate. 

Female dogs may also have blood in their urine, which is less common in male dogs.

In general, the symptoms of a UTI are the same in both male and female dogs, but there may be some subtle differences. 

If you think your dog may have a UTI, it’s important to take him to the vet for diagnosis and treatment.

Can a UTI sometimes be mistaken for other diseases?

Some diseases can mimic the symptoms of a UTI in dogs. 

These diseases include bladder cancer, prostate infection, and kidney stones. 

It’s important to get your dog checked out by a vet if he is showing any of the symptoms of a UTI so that the correct diagnosis can be made and treatment can be started. 

If your dog is showing any symptoms, don’t assume it’s just a UTI; get him to the vet as soon as possible. 

Wrong treatment may worsen your dog’s condition, so getting a proper diagnosis from a vet is important before starting any treatment.

What are the common causes of UTIs in male dogs?

Several things can cause a UTI in a male dog, including:

Bacterial infection

This is the most common cause of UTIs in both male and female dogs. 

Bacteria can enter the urinary system through the urethra and travel up to the bladder, where they multiply and cause an infection.

Bladder stones

Bladder stones are small mineral deposits that can form in the bladder. 

They can block the urethra and make it difficult for urine to flow out of the bladder, leading to an accumulation of bacteria and a UTI.

Prostate problems

The prostate gland can enlarge with age, which can block the urethra and make it difficult for urine to flow out of the bladder. 

This can lead to an accumulation of bacteria in the bladder, which can cause a UTI.

Kidney disease

Kidney disease can cause an accumulation of bacteria in the urinary system, leading to a UTI.

Diabetes

Diabetes can increase the amount of sugar in the urine, providing a food source for bacteria and leading to a UTI.

Are these causes different for female dogs?

A bacterial infection is the most common cause of a UTI in both male and female dogs. 

However, there are some key differences between the two. 

For example, bladder stones are more common in male dogs, while prostate problems are more common in female dogs. 

Kidney disease and diabetes can also lead to UTIs in male and female dogs.

What are the risk factors for UTIs in male dogs?

Several things can increase your dog’s risk of developing a UTI, including:

Being male

Male dogs are more likely to develop a UTI than female dogs because they have a shorter urethra, making it easier for bacteria to enter the urinary system.

Being senior

Senior dogs are more likely to develop a UTI than younger dogs because their kidneys and bladder can become less efficient with age, which can lead to an accumulation of bacteria in the urinary system.

Having kidney disease

Kidney disease can cause an accumulation of bacteria in the urinary system, which can lead to a UTI.

Having diabetes

Diabetes can increase the amount of sugar in the urine, providing a food source for bacteria and leading to a UTI.

Having a suppressed immune system

A suppressed immune system can make it more difficult for the body to fight off infection, which can lead to a UTI.

Being overweight

Being overweight can put extra pressure on the bladder and urinary system, which can lead to a UTI.

How is a UTI diagnosed?

If you think your dog may have a UTI, it’s important to take him to the vet for diagnosis and treatment. 

The vet will start by taking a history and performing a physical examination. 

They will then order a urine culture to confirm the presence of bacteria in the urine. 

The vet may also order X-rays or ultrasounds to look for bladder stones or other abnormalities.

What are the best ways of treating a UTI?

There are a number of ways that you can treat a UTI, depending on the severity of the infection. For mild infections, your veterinarian may prescribe antibiotics. However, hospitalization and aggressive treatment with intravenous antibiotics may be necessary for more severe infections. In some cases, surgery may be required to correct any underlying anatomical abnormalities that may be contributing to the recurrent infections.

If your dog is prone to UTIs, there are a few things that you can do to help prevent them. First, ensure that he is well hydrated by ensuring he has access to fresh, clean water at all times. You might also want to feed him a diet that is high in fiber to help keep his urinary tract healthy. Finally, avoid letting him hold his urine for long periods of time by taking him out to relieve himself frequently.

Is there a way that a UTI can be treated at home?

You can try several home remedies to treat a UTI, but it is important to speak to your veterinarian first. Some common home remedies include increasing your dog’s water intake, feeding him cranberry juice or supplements, and adding probiotics to his diet. However, it is important to note that these home remedies will not cure a UTI on their own and should only be used in addition to veterinary care.

If your dog is suffering from a UTI, it is important to get him to the vet as soon as possible so that he can receive the treatment he needs. With prompt and proper treatment, most dogs make a full recovery and go on to live normal, healthy lives.

How can a UTI in a male dog be prevented?

There are several things you can do to help prevent your dog from getting a UTI, including:

Feeding a balanced diet: A balanced diet helps keep the urinary system healthy and reduces the risk of infection.

Providing plenty of fresh water: Fresh water helps flush out bacteria and keep the urinary system healthy.

Cleaning the genital area regularly: Regular cleaning helps remove bacteria from the genital area and reduce the risk of infection.

Taking your dog to the vet regularly: Regular vet checkups can help identify problems early and prevent them from becoming worse.

Using a urinary tract supplement: Urinary tract supplements can help keep the urinary system healthy and reduce the risk of infection.

Avoiding constipation: Constipation can put extra pressure on the bladder and urinary system, which can lead to a UTI.

If your dog does develop a UTI, it is important to seek veterinary treatment immediately. Untreated UTIs can lead to serious health problems, including kidney damage, bladder stones, and even death. With prompt treatment, most dogs recover quickly and without any lasting effects.

Is a UTI more common in male dogs that have been neutered?

There is no definitive answer to this question. Some studies have shown that neutered male dogs are more likely to develop UTIs, while other studies have shown no difference in the incidence of UTIs between neutered and unneutered dogs. The best way to prevent UTIs in your dog is to take him to the vet regularly, clean his genital area regularly, and provide him with plenty of fresh water.

Some studies show that male dogs who are not neutered are also more likely to develop UTIs, as the presence of testicles can block the urethra and trap bacteria in the bladder. If your dog is exhibiting any signs of a UTI, it is important to take him to the vet for a checkup and treatment as soon as possible. Untreated UTIs can lead to serious health complications, such as kidney damage.

Are male dogs from specific breeds more likely to get a UTI

There is no definitive answer to this question, as any breed of dog can develop a UTI. However, some breeds are more prone to developing urinary tract infections than others. For example, small breeds such as Yorkshire Terriers and Pomeranians are more likely to suffer from UTIs than large breeds. This is because their miniature urinary tracts make them more susceptible to bacteria build-up. Male dogs are also more likely to develop UTIs than female dogs due to the length of their urethras.

If your dog is displaying any signs of a UTI, it is important to take him to the vet as soon as possible. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential in preventing the infection from spreading and causing further damage to your dog’s urinary tract.

The Bottom Line

Female dogs can get UTIs, but the condition is more common in male dogs. You can do several things to help prevent UTIs in your dog, including feeding him a balanced diet, providing plenty of fresh water, and cleaning his genital area regularly. If your dog does develop a UTI, it is important to seek veterinary treatment immediately. With prompt treatment, most dogs make a full recovery. Have you ever dealt with a UTI in your dog? What tips would you add to this list? Let us know in the comments below!

Photo Credits

¹ Photo by Michael Coghlan on Flickr

James Grayston

My name is James and I love dogs. have owned four Golden Retrievers in the past 15 years. Currently I own two "Goldies"- a five year old and a seven month old. The photo shows me with our youngest when she was about 7 weeks old!